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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
. ♪ >>> as we attempt to start a national conversation in the wake of the connecticut tragedy, here's a fact to consider. 15 million american children have some sort of mental health disorder. >> and many of those going undiagnosed or en if they have diagnosed, they haven't gotten the help they need. some of the parents are expressing concerns about what could happen if they don't get help. abc's john donovan reports. >> reporter: there are homes that no nothing of raising a troubled child. then there are those that do. liza long posted "i am adam lanza's mother" that rocketed around the world. i love my sop, she wrote. but he terrifies me. >> my biggest fear is that some day he'll fly into a rage and hurt me or himself. >> reporter: he is mentally ill and has threatened her, even pulled a knife on her. she called this a cry for help. >> i'm afraid for my daughter. i'm fearful for my daughter. this could have been my son. i'm fearful what will happen to her or anybody that's around her. would this be her that i'm getting a phone call about? >> reporter: it was connecticut that triggered this
of newtown, connecticut. the people of connecticut can relate to these victims of the assault and all americans can relate to some extent this crime that's occurred. at this elementary school. madam speaker, i have four kids and 10 grandkids, three of my daughters are teachers by profession. my wife is a first grade elementary school teacher. and no parent, no parent ever wants to bury their child. they just don't want to do that. we never want our children to die in their youth. like these children did. so, madam speaker, we mourn with the families of connecticut. we must honor the victims in our prayers and in our words and ask the good lord to bless them, their families, the people of connecticut and yes, our country. and that's just the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: the mall shooting that might have been worse and ended in newtown, connecticut, where it's impossible to imagine that it was worse. it's part of an ongoing pattern of c
or communities, and to my colleagues in the connecticut delegation and especially to mr. murphy who represents newtown, my thoughts and prayers are with each of you during this really difficult and incomprehensible time. but be assured that as a member of congress, i'm going to work with you, i'm going to continue to pray with you, and i'm going to make certain that this doesn't happen again because we have an obligation, we know what our to-do list is and we have only to do it before year's end and with that i yield. . mr. murphy: i yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. engel. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. engel: mr. speaker, i have been to newtown, connecticut, and it's less than an hour's drive from my congressional district. we mourn all the people who lost their lives on friday, including 20 elementary school children and six educators. over the past few years, we have seen innocent lives lost to gun violence in a supermarket parking lot in arizona, a movie theater in colorado, an army base in texas, a college campus in virginia and now an elementary school
since the connecticut shootings. abc's amy robach reports on what was an anxious monday for many. >> reporter: parents around innation dropped their children off at school. many holding on a little more tightly. a day of jitters. schools from new york to tennessee to texas all went on alert after fear ignited several false alarms, some bomb threats. others as minor as an umbrella mistaken for a gun. an elementary school in richfield, connecticut, just 20 miles from newtown, went into lockdown after someone reported a suspicious person. security on the minds of principal, it was a priority of sandy hook's own principal, killed in the mass shooting. we spoke with her best friend. safety was important to her. >> safety was her number one priority. she wanted school to be a safe haven. a place where students could come and feel comfortable, like it was their second home. >> reporter: from coast to coast, principals were re-evaluating security and taking extra measures to protect their students. in pittsburgh, security guards now have guns. in this california school, the day started w
. jenna: schools in newtown, connecticut, opening for the very first time after the deadly rampage at sandy hook elementary. just as we learn new details about the gunman, two more young victims are laid to rest today. plus a major cybersecurity threat. what you need to know to protect your bank accounts on-line especially in the new year. >>> a hour harrowing ordeal for a tv news correspondent and his crew, kidnapped five days in syria. the latest details on their escape. it's haul l all "happening now" jenna: great to have you with us on this tuesday. i'm jenna lee. jon: i'm jon scott. the latest on the tragedy in connecticut. while investigators search for answers there are some students are heading back to school right now. rick leventhal has the latest from newtown. what is going on there today, rick? >> reporter: jon incredibly challenging times for the community, struggling are with the aftermath after that horrific mass murder. sending kids back to school and reassuring those kids they will be safe in those classrooms. in fact security has been beefed up at the six cools in
in politics, where emotion will pull the logic train. the emotion of what happened in newtown, connecticut, the emotion contained in a week of funerals, we're at the front of a church or synagogue or a mosque, you're going to be very small -- there are going to be very small caskets. t.j., if we still have the picture of jack pinto buried yesterday in newtown, connecticut, buried in his little league uniform, that right there is what is going to change the dialogue for this. people carry around for years pictures of their children in little league uniforms, hockey uniforms, first and second grade school picture. that's the picture, the emotion that will pull this thing. >> if it doesn't, there's a serious problem. i understand the president does -- has a lot to do, when it comes to making sure that our economy doesn't fall off the cliff. there are tens of millions of working americans that know that the fiscal cliff situation needs to be addressed. isn't human nature funny, though, how we need to get moving on this? >> those critical issues you just mentioned, they seem so insignificant. >
obama was in connecticut last night speaking to a high school gymnasium as part of a memorial service. he said some things. no set of laws can eliminate evil from the world or prevalent every senseless act of violence in our society but that can't be an excuse for inaction. >> right there, i feel better. that can't be excuse for inactions. that means he is committed and going on the recognize, some kind of action. >> good morning, it's tuesday, december 18th. with us, we have mike barnicle, author of "thomas jefferson," willie, joe and me as well. >> that was fascinating, wasn't it? >> that was. that was dead serious. he was not feeling anything else at that point, i think. >> i tell you, yesterday really did touch americans in a way, this whole weekend, and the president's speech and people like joe manchin stepping forward, really, i think -- i think it's got americans talking, for the first time, on this issue, in a really surprising way. i was -- i was struck not by how many democrats or liberals called after the show and said, boy, we really liked what you guys did and the conver
, connecticut. before we begin, is there anybody else here who has a story they want to share? i also come to this issue through personal experience. my younger brother was shot in a shooting that happened on the observation deck of the empire state building and i have some prepared remarks here but before i begin them, i just want to point out today there will be 32 more families that know the pain and horror that you just heard here today. we pay a lot of attention, and appropriately so, to these mass shootings, the one that andre's son miraculously survived, but we also have to be aware that this happens in our nation every day and as you're going to hear today, as a nation, we are better than this. i want to thank you all for coming on what we are confident is a momentous day in the history of this issue. we have people here from all over the country from utah, california, from colorado, and connecticut. we're here because we love our children, our husbands, our wives, our brothers, and our sisters. we mourn them and we wish they hadn't been shot. we're here as a testament to our love
in connecticut is outrageous and horrible. all of us are just very saddened. >> see the rest of this sequence -- segment at c-span.org. >> io am davejkeane president of the national rifle association and i would like to welcome you to begin our discussion of the topic that has been on the minds of american parents across this country. that is -- what do we do about the tragedy of the sort that struck in newtown, conn. to avoid such events in the future? like most americans, we were shocked by what happened. like all americans, we have been discussing all of the various options that are available to protect our children and, at this point, we would like to share our thinking with few. that purpose, i like to introduce wayne lapierre our executive vice president. at the end of this conference, we will not be taking questions that next week, we will be available to any of you who are interested in talking about these or other issues of interest. contact us, please, at that point, thank you very much. wayne? >> good morning. the national rifle association, 4 million others -- mothers, fathers, so
morning beginning with "the connecticut post." - you can see the flag remaining at half staff outside one of the churches in newtown, conn. following the burial of 20 children and six women killed about a week and a half ago. this is from the front page of today's "new york daily news." finally, from the front page is this report about what is ahead in terms of the gun control fight. we heard from the nra friday. let me read you a few sentences -- that was nearly 20 years ago in 1993. we will hear from that testimony in a couple of minutes. we want to get your calls and what is ahead in gun-control. roy is joining us from north carolina, the independent line, good morning. caller: it could be a bitter fight but i think some drastic action needs to be taken. it should be at least as burdensome for the gun owner as it is for a car owner. registration, insurance, testing, everything -- handguns are a big problem, too. i think it is so bad that the president should do some kind of executive order and put a moratorium on military rifles, at least, because around here in western north carolina,
in residential buildings. only connecticut requires them in public and private schools. the atlanta like started in a boiler. >> time to follow connecticut's lead. >> mm-hmm. >>> trader joe's is now recalling thousand of pound of frozen chicken. the store's frozen butter chicken with basmati rice meals may be tainted with listeria. dangerous bacteria. more than 4,000 pound may be at risk. look for 12 1/2 ounce boxes with you see on the screen 30512. make sure you return it for a refund. >>> and 'tis the season to trim the trees and heed to the fire dangers we can face. firefighters in des moines showed how quickly your christmas tree and your entire home can go up in flames. the demonstration shows what could happen itch a live tree is not watered every single day. i am a big fan of the plastic trees. i don't tend to have this problem, but you like live trees. >> i like live trees. >> you have to water them every day. >> i water them every other day. >> because you're on fire. >> didn't notice that. >> instead of girl on fire. boy on fire. >> looks like willis' apartment. we'll be back with more
, this gun law by itself, we don't know if it would have prevented the massacre in connecticut. we just know, as sam said, after oregon, after colorado, after -- i think minnesota, the temple in minnesota. >> tucson, gabby giffords. >> after tucson, gabby giffords, after connecticut last week. these are no longer isolated random acts of violence. let's bring in jim vandehei with "politico's" playbook. and jim, it's not a cold december. things are heating up. >> it's not. we're talking about gun control, but if you think about the election, which seems so small, so little talk about what would happen in the next year, we now have two months where we'll be dealing with tax increases, entitlement reform, gun control and i think a real debate about creating a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants in the country, all in the first three months of this congress. and all of these are going to test what al was talking about earlier, that there is rhetorically a lot of republicans are saying the right thing. if you watch it, they've sort of put a sock in it when it comes to gay marriage, when
, connecticut, for all the good this nation has done to lift up children we still have much more work to do. so, mr. speaker, before i get into my remarks about the bill, i first want to extend my heartfelt condolences to the victims and their loved ones struggling as we all are to understand this senseless assault on children and their educators. and while newtown is rightly receiving the nation's attention, what goes unnoticed far too often is the number of children that die each year in this country as a result of abuse and neglect. sadly their deaths often come at the hands of those who should be caring for them the most. state reports indicate that more than 1,500 children in the u.s. died from abuse or neglect in fiscal year 2010. and research shows that these reports may significantly understate the actual number of these fatalities. congress should do what it can to prevent these tragedies which is why this legislation is before us today. this legislation is a result of careful bipartisan work over the past couple of years. in 2010 i requested that the government accountability office,
. national rifle association breaking its silence one week after the horrific school shooting in connecticut. proposing armed guards and teachers at every school in america. is that a good idea. we're going to debate that next. then a u.p.s. driver does last minute christmas shopping on a customer's front porch. we have got the video that got him in trouble. let's give thanks - for an idea. a grand idea called america. the idea that if you work hard, if you have a dream, if you work with your neighbors... you can do most anything. this led to other ideas like lerty and rock 'n' roll. to free markets, free enterprise, and free refills. it put a man on the moon and a phone in your pocket. our country's gone through a lot over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people believe in the american idea and when they do, the dream comes true. we're grateful to be a part of it. [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. a
was pastoring the metropolitan community church of hartford, connecticut, and in 1981, we began hearing stories of this new gayancer and gay men getting a strange form of pneumonia. when i started getting sick in 1982, they still weren't quite sure what to call it. they hadn't discovered the virus. they could tell my immune system was severely deficient, but i didn't have any of what were then the five defining diseases of aids. well, the most important thing in investigating a new disease outbreak is to determine, in fact, is it really a new disease outbreak? is the disease new? is it occurring with greater frequency? who's affected by it, and where will it go? what are the horizons of the epidemic, if it's an epidemic? so the most important thing for us initially was to construct a case definition for what is now called aids. so it was decided that we would define aids on the basis of certain illnesses that were never seen in normal people that must somehow be part of this epidemic. some of them were these opportunistic infections, some of them were very strange cancers, and, at that moment,
interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper appreciation prehuman dimension of representative government in this temple of liberty we know as the united states capitol. senator daniel inouye was born in honolulu hawaii on september 7th, 1924 and was named after a methodist minister who had adopted his mother. in march, 1943, he enlisted in the u.s. army's 44 regimental a team. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded the distinguished service cross which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, the highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduate
's okay because in the middle of the night, there's this soldier from connecticut who was dumbing down help across the delaware, and will reach up and see this guy with a right to stick his arm out and grab him from his white horse. he told all his buddies this guys with this. leadership at all these elements. but anyway, washington's weaknesses make him just so much more brilliant. longmore, it should be noted, was a big activist in the handicapped rights movement, and i realized after i read this bugaboo, the kind of book where you're calling a to come and sing listen to this, listen to this. and i realized that he had typed the entire book -- [inaudible] and he had worked for disabled rights, and he, i him give a speech on video after i rea reae book but i realize hittite this, and he was giving a speech at another disabled rights, a memorial for another disabled rights person died and longmore said basically that this guy, you know, the movement made this great new. >> wanted to footnotes in the book made me read another book, which i hate reading books. but much more important we
in history. a gunman walked into the sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut and opened fire. >> he came late in my life but jesse was my best friend and my buddy, too. my little boy said something the night before to me and he said, dad, this is going to be the best christmas ever. and he was going on about it and i said, jesse, you know, it's -- you know, we'll make it the best we can and i don't have much family so it's kind of a quiet time for me and he made christmas happy for me and joyful and he made it what it was and i said to him, jess, we'll make it the best we can. and the next day this tragedy happened that occurred and i thought to myself, boy, was he wrong about that. >> the ar-15, as we've now seen from the last three mass shootings in america, aurora, oregon and now the sandy hook school is the preferred choice of weapon for disturbed young men who want to commit atrocities. the president of the united states has indicated he wants to ban assault weapons like this. what is your view? >> i think we need to ban gun laws that ban people from protecting themselve
recognition? without objection, the gentleman from connecticut is recognized for one minute. mr. courtney: we have the power as members to actually pay this country back from a fiscal cliff which endangers an economic recovery and threatens middle class families across the country. the good news is there right now. consumer confidence is up, car sales are up, even the housing market is making a he recovery. if we do not, however, act, to sign this discharge petition and protect middle class families, we will go backwards as a nation. it will also solve 3/4 of the sequestration challenge that the budget control act is still sitting out there for january 2. if we sign this discharge petition, get this bill passed, 3/4 of the problems will be solved and we'll protect medicare, we'll protect our military, we'll protect education. and it will reduce the size of the challenge to avoid sequestration. all members, republicans and democrats, should come together, sign this discharge petition, and help the american people get this economy back on its feet. i yield back the balance of my time. the speak
, connecticut, many wonder what do they have in common? gun tragedy, the loss of 26 lives, and americans suffering from a devastating storm, certainly our hearts goes out to those babies who were lost. but it really speaks to americans in need, and i guess that's why i'm so troubled to be on the floor today, because the framework that we have says to america that when you're in need we will not as this congress and this government be prepared to help you. i think what is disappointing and i know for the speaker, it is probably the same case as i am speaking because just about three days ago we thought there was a deal between the white house and the framework that was offered and the leadership of this house. it's disappointing that in the course of a couple days we've come to a situation where this plan, plan b, raises only about $300 billion from high-income households and the centers for budget priorities suggest that millionaires will get $108,500 per $1 million, over $1 million in tax cuts, but what will the middle class gets? plan b allows the old pre-bush or bush tax cuts to conti
us on the democratic line from connecticut. caller: good morning. my question is, in watching c- span over the years, i noticed there was once an episode where an economist talked-about a world view on reducing the imprint of the military and using limited black ops and to intervene in situations to quell unrest in the discos along with the things like the economy -- this goes along with things like the economy. my question is how do you see us going black ops and the cia? is this not what we did in afghanistan? guest: i understand there is a very wrong perception among the public that all special ops do are black ops and unilateral raids in the dead of night. that perception is widely held. in the case of columbia, the philippines, yemen, these other places that i am talking about, the governments have invited special operations forces in to help them, to help their country's forces. that is why i think it is such an effective use in the long term. it does not cause the same political diplomatic controversy as many people know what happened after the bin laden rate. it was a huge rup
the wealthy but everyone. what it means, frankly, is whether you live in connecticut like the presiding officer or illinois like myself, every family is going to see several things happen automatically. taxes will go up. the payroll tax cut that has helped this economy is going to disappear. unemployment benefits are going to disappear for millions of americans who are searching for work, and many other changes will take place, none of which will be favorable in terms of an economic recovery. i think that we ought to stop and reflect for a moment here on lessons learned. here's what i have learned. if we're going to solve this problem, we need to do two things. we need to be prepared on both sides of the table to give, and that's a hard thing for many people to acknowledge, but we do. we have to be willing to give on both sides of the table. i remember senator reid receiving a letter after the super committee was hard at work coming up with a bipartisan proposal, signed by virtually every senator on the other side of the aisle, said do not include a penny of revenue. that was the end of
-up -- if you are poor, you'd have to spend a lot of energy to get enough to eat. john, connecticut. good morning. caller: good morning. i was calling to mention low- quality food and the cost of health care, but you covered that well. do you think it would be more beneficial if they start doing a local farming program where they could start growing vegetables? maybe have some land with tiles -- cows and chickens, and local people could work on the farming areas and return the food to the communities as opposed to being so reliant on high-salt diets, the foods we would coin as having a long shelf life, leaving it on the shelf for six months without going bad? has the government been able to look into those programs, considering the finances involved in the program as a whole? host: thank you. a related topic -- the availability of this fresh produce is a big distraction for many. guest: there are some programs that speak directly to the point, one our farms-to-school programs, directed to help know where food is coming from and getting fresher food into the schools. in addition, we talk
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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